Common Ground

Common Ground

This work is a synthesis of found images, taken from the streets that I experience being in two area codes almost daily, separated by distance as well as perhaps income level, industrial vs high-end retail atmosphere, then interfused with my studio work. Hybridizing the images from the sidewalk, the photographing of just what appears before my feet; Anything from trash, shadows, to the local graffiti images mostly taken from the pavements, I’m continuing my attempt to level the disparity and separations we experience daily without noticing. Oddly my improvised drawings (intuitive mark makings often without literal meaning) seem to share with the local graffiti marks some attributes; spontaneity and speed accompanied by some intention, (at least interpreting what’s apparent); then the blending and stratifying with no particular order of the two different spontaneous acts from at least two different participants (although unwittingly by at least one party) as an amalgamation of marks purports to be simulating one voice.
It’s about desiring a connection with other street sharers (who maybe artistic but unschooled, or who may just want to dirty up the sidewalks with whatever crosses their minds at the time), as well, making a connection to art making as a practice that is inherently dependent on the nature (or the environment, the landscape, the culture) the artist crosses paths with.

This may be a futile attempt but it’s a way of blending mid downtown Los Angeles to the highly commercial zones of the west side through my commute to the studio. The fashion district where the studio is located, where the pavement concrete hasn’t been renewed in decades is quite different from a zone just a couple of miles East where new galleries pop up every few months (the gentrification driving up the real estate to match that of the west side, where every 6ft square pavement is not decorated by 1000 chewing gums accumulated over time), while in between my studio and this new developed area is 2 miles of skid row filled with homeless people in tents. For whatever it’s worth, I wanted to include the much derided graffiti or other stains on the pavements (the neglect by the city in a sense) in the discourse of art (their seemingly purposelessness with consciously contrived purposelessness I suppose- also the marks made by graffitists are more likely to have purpose as they are messages, at least for their designated viewers; whose purpose or purposelessness is more worthy is quite debatable between a commercial artist or a graffiti artist who maybe expressing some sort of anarchist disdain for the society- which all of us can relate to at some level.